The Over and Under Use of ADHD Medication Treatment

Although medication treatment for ADHD has been shown to significantly reduce core ADHD symptoms in hundreds of studies, important concerns remain about it being prescribed inappropriately to children and teens who do not have ADHD. There is also evidence that many youth with ADHD who could potentially benefit from medication treatment do not receive it, and may realize poorer outcomes in as a result.

Herb-Drug Interactions

The possibility of drug interactions, direct toxicities, and contamination with active pharmaceutical agents are among the safety concerns about dietary and herbal supplements.

Do ADHD Drugs Help College Students Without ADHD?

Do ADHD Drugs Help College Students Without ADHD? by Dr. David Rabiner Dr. Rabiner is a child clinical psychologist and Director of Undergraduate Studies in the Department of Psychology and Neuroscience at Duke University Over the past 15 years there has been growing awareness that many college students without an ADHD diagnosis use ADHD drugs. … Read more

Medicine Cost Information

This Medicine Assistance Tool (MAT) is a free-to-use search engine that focuses its searches on patient assistance resources available to eligible patients.

Why College Students Don’t Regularly Use Their ADHD Meds

The transition to college is challenging for many students and can be especially difficult for those with ADHD. Many who have relied on parents to help them with organization and time management struggle when this help is less available.
Compared to what they were used to in high school, life for most college students is less structured and there are often large gaps between when class assignments are due. Many classes have no attendance policy and it is solely up to students to get themselves consistently to class. Read More…

Taking Meds for ADHD: We Finally Know What Predicts Adherence in Kids

William T. Basco, Jr, MD, MS October 30, 2018 What are the factors that predict adherence with ADHD medication? A prospective longitudinal cohort study[1] attempted to answer that question by examining a range of demographic and clinical characteristics that may predict improved adherence. These included physician behaviors and practices; parental practices, including several qualitative measures; family beliefs about … Read more

English English Spanish Spanish French French
/* Clarify tracking https://clarity.microsoft.com/ */